/page/2

sprookyloser:

Don’t be a religious suburban white mom about it

(via lotsalipstick)

#293 Because of breast cancer awareness campaigns.

365reasonstobeafeminist:

Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and sheds thousands of lives every year. It mainly affects middle-aged persons and many of those have to undergo a masectomy as part of their treatment. Yet, a new trend awareness advertising is glossing over what breast cancer really means. This trend centres around hetero male sexual gratification and uses language which focuses on saving the breasts, hooters, tatas and boobs rather than saving people . As Sara Florencepoints out:

"A campaign that utilizes images of young, healthy women with supple, and more to the point, present breasts is not exactly sensitive to the needs of the demographic it’s supposed to be supporting. Furthermore, using sexualized humor to make light of the rather harrowing experience of actually losing one’s breast to a deadly disease is really just twisting the knife.”

image

image

image

So what is the problem here then?

Well, firstly there is no reason to sexualise a life-threatening disease. Breast cancer doesn’t just affect breasts, it affects people. Persons. Human lives. Secondly, breasts do not solely exist for nothing other than hetero cis male pleasure. Finally, what is the point in supporting a disease that mainly affects women, while simultaneously objectifying and sexualising their bodies? These campaigns might raise a bit of cash and awareness, but they are mainly undermining the status of women in society.

"When a campaign to raise awareness and funds to fight a deadly disease appeals to the potential loss of a sexual object, rather than the potential loss of a human life, it sends a powerful message about what our society values. The sexism of breast cancer awareness normalizes the view that women are sexual objects rather than subjects with agency and dignity."

-Beth Mendenhall.

image

(via kindlyalex)

awildhyzyappears:

kids books, reimagined for 20-somethings

(via tangledupinlace)

Sexualities (And Other Terms One Should Know)

  • (Please assume by "women"/"female", I mean anyone who identifies as a woman, same goes for men)
  • Heterosexual: A man sexually attracted to woman and vice versa.
  • Homosexual: A man sexually attracted to a man or a woman sexually attracted to a woman.
  • Bisexual: Sexually attracted to two or more genders.
  • Pansexual: Sexually attracted to all genders.
  • Demisexual: The sexual behavior of having a bond with a person before having sexual attraction.
  • Asexual: Having no /sexual attraction/ to others.
  • Heteroromantic: Attracted romantically to the opposite gender.
  • Homoromantic: Attracted romantically to the same gender.
  • Biromantic: Attracted romantically to two or more genders
  • Panromantic: Attracted romantically to all genders
  • Demiromantic: Only able to feel romantic affections to someone who has a bond already with you.
  • Aromantic: Having no /romantic attraction/ to others.
  • Transexual/Transgender (Term depending on generation and location): An individual who identifies as the opposite gender then the one they are assigned at birth to be. Often shortened to trans
  • Cisgender: Someone who identifies as the gender that they were assigned as at birth. (ex. matches their birth certificate) Often shortened to cis
  • Intersex: Someone who has ambiguous genitalia that doesn't fit into our strict dichotomy of uterus or testes. Often forced into surgery to correct their genitals at a very young age, causing psychological and physical harm later in life
  • Nonbinary: Outside of the gender binary of male and female. (Can be used as an umbrella term or as its own identity)
  • Genderqueer: Outside of the gender binary. (Can be used as an umbrella term or as its own identity, but be wary of using it as an umbrella term because it contains queer, which some people still consider a slur and don't like having it applied to them)
  • Agender: Someone who doesn't identify as any gender/experiences a lack of gender.
  • Bigender: Someone who identifies as two separate genders.
  • Genderfluid: Gender that changes.
  • Demigirl: Identifying partially as a woman, but not wholly.
  • Demiguy: Identifying partially as a man, but not wholly.
  • Androgynous: Partly male and partly female in appearance; of indeterminate sex.

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

Follow micdotcom

(via oceantides)

lovelyclusters:

INNER VOICE 12 x 12 modern abstract inspirational art print (more colors) by KhristianAHowell (http://ift.tt/1uXJqyu)PURCHASE HERE: http://ift.tt/1ezdvjq

lovelyclusters:

INNER VOICE 12 x 12 modern abstract inspirational art print (more colors) by KhristianAHowell (http://ift.tt/1uXJqyu)
PURCHASE HERE: http://ift.tt/1ezdvjq


and i remember..

and i remember..

(Source: colldasyou, via forthedream)

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

– Terry Pratchett, “Men At Arms”

This is one of the best breakdowns I’ve ever seen of how expensive it is to be poor. (via sosungalittleclodofclay)

(Source: slephoto, via polibohoglam)

sprookyloser:

Don’t be a religious suburban white mom about it

(via lotsalipstick)

#293 Because of breast cancer awareness campaigns.

365reasonstobeafeminist:

Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and sheds thousands of lives every year. It mainly affects middle-aged persons and many of those have to undergo a masectomy as part of their treatment. Yet, a new trend awareness advertising is glossing over what breast cancer really means. This trend centres around hetero male sexual gratification and uses language which focuses on saving the breasts, hooters, tatas and boobs rather than saving people . As Sara Florencepoints out:

"A campaign that utilizes images of young, healthy women with supple, and more to the point, present breasts is not exactly sensitive to the needs of the demographic it’s supposed to be supporting. Furthermore, using sexualized humor to make light of the rather harrowing experience of actually losing one’s breast to a deadly disease is really just twisting the knife.”

image

image

image

So what is the problem here then?

Well, firstly there is no reason to sexualise a life-threatening disease. Breast cancer doesn’t just affect breasts, it affects people. Persons. Human lives. Secondly, breasts do not solely exist for nothing other than hetero cis male pleasure. Finally, what is the point in supporting a disease that mainly affects women, while simultaneously objectifying and sexualising their bodies? These campaigns might raise a bit of cash and awareness, but they are mainly undermining the status of women in society.

"When a campaign to raise awareness and funds to fight a deadly disease appeals to the potential loss of a sexual object, rather than the potential loss of a human life, it sends a powerful message about what our society values. The sexism of breast cancer awareness normalizes the view that women are sexual objects rather than subjects with agency and dignity."

-Beth Mendenhall.

image

(via kindlyalex)

awildhyzyappears:

kids books, reimagined for 20-somethings

(via tangledupinlace)

Sexualities (And Other Terms One Should Know)

  • (Please assume by "women"/"female", I mean anyone who identifies as a woman, same goes for men)
  • Heterosexual: A man sexually attracted to woman and vice versa.
  • Homosexual: A man sexually attracted to a man or a woman sexually attracted to a woman.
  • Bisexual: Sexually attracted to two or more genders.
  • Pansexual: Sexually attracted to all genders.
  • Demisexual: The sexual behavior of having a bond with a person before having sexual attraction.
  • Asexual: Having no /sexual attraction/ to others.
  • Heteroromantic: Attracted romantically to the opposite gender.
  • Homoromantic: Attracted romantically to the same gender.
  • Biromantic: Attracted romantically to two or more genders
  • Panromantic: Attracted romantically to all genders
  • Demiromantic: Only able to feel romantic affections to someone who has a bond already with you.
  • Aromantic: Having no /romantic attraction/ to others.
  • Transexual/Transgender (Term depending on generation and location): An individual who identifies as the opposite gender then the one they are assigned at birth to be. Often shortened to trans
  • Cisgender: Someone who identifies as the gender that they were assigned as at birth. (ex. matches their birth certificate) Often shortened to cis
  • Intersex: Someone who has ambiguous genitalia that doesn't fit into our strict dichotomy of uterus or testes. Often forced into surgery to correct their genitals at a very young age, causing psychological and physical harm later in life
  • Nonbinary: Outside of the gender binary of male and female. (Can be used as an umbrella term or as its own identity)
  • Genderqueer: Outside of the gender binary. (Can be used as an umbrella term or as its own identity, but be wary of using it as an umbrella term because it contains queer, which some people still consider a slur and don't like having it applied to them)
  • Agender: Someone who doesn't identify as any gender/experiences a lack of gender.
  • Bigender: Someone who identifies as two separate genders.
  • Genderfluid: Gender that changes.
  • Demigirl: Identifying partially as a woman, but not wholly.
  • Demiguy: Identifying partially as a man, but not wholly.
  • Androgynous: Partly male and partly female in appearance; of indeterminate sex.

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

Follow micdotcom

(via oceantides)

lovelyclusters:

INNER VOICE 12 x 12 modern abstract inspirational art print (more colors) by KhristianAHowell (http://ift.tt/1uXJqyu)PURCHASE HERE: http://ift.tt/1ezdvjq

lovelyclusters:

INNER VOICE 12 x 12 modern abstract inspirational art print (more colors) by KhristianAHowell (http://ift.tt/1uXJqyu)
PURCHASE HERE: http://ift.tt/1ezdvjq

newyorker:

A cartoon by Liana Finck, in this week’s issue.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Liana Finck, in this week’s issue.


and i remember..

and i remember..

(Source: colldasyou, via forthedream)

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

– Terry Pratchett, “Men At Arms”

This is one of the best breakdowns I’ve ever seen of how expensive it is to be poor. (via sosungalittleclodofclay)

(Source: slephoto, via polibohoglam)

Sexualities (And Other Terms One Should Know)
"

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

"

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